FAQ

Your audience, song, and playlist stats update once a day at approximately 3pm EST.

The real-time stream count for your new release updates every 1.5 seconds. This is only available in the Spotify for Artists app and only for the first 7 days of your release.

You can export some stats from Spotify for Artists as .csv files. Just click the download arrow near the three datasets you’re able to export:

  1. The timeline stats in Audience
  2. The song table in Songs
  3. The playlist table in Playlists

For audience stats — You can track your daily unique listeners, daily streams, and followers from January 2015 through today, or from when your music was first available on Spotify—whichever came first.

For song stats — You can track your daily unique listeners and daily streams from January 2015 through today. All-time streams of songs are available from October 2008, or from when your song was first available on Spotify—whichever came first.

When you hover over your listener or stream timeline graphs, you see the number of unique listeners or streams your music had on that specific date. You can use this to track engagement after a new release, or understand how your marketing or promotional efforts are impacting your growth.

When you hover over your follower timeline graph, you see the total number of followers you had on Spotify on a specific date. Your total number of followers updates every day, and also shows up in the About section on your Spotify artist profile.

Followers are listeners who follow you on Spotify. They get your new music in their Release Radar playlist and in their personalized new release emails. They also hear about your upcoming concerts in our concert recommendation emails, on the homescreen of their Spotify app, and on their concerts page—which features a list of upcoming concerts in their area.

You can encourage your fans on social media and other platforms to follow you on Spotify by directing them to your artist profile.

We heard from artists that the word “fan” can mean different things to different people. We want our stats to be as clear as possible, so we phased this one out.

You do see follower stats now. Your followers stream your music at significantly higher rates—and your following on Spotify is also something you can take control of. Encourage your followers on social media and other platforms to follow you on Spotify—and let them know it’s a great way to stay up to date on what you’re up to. All they have to do is go to your artist profile on Spotify and hit the Follow button.

Monthly listeners are unique listeners who play your music during a 28-day period. This stat updates every day, and appears on both your artist profile on Spotify and right above the timeline graph in the Audience section of Spotify for Artists.

2 important things to clarify about your monthly listeners:

  • They’ve listened within a rolling window of 28 days. Not within the months of January, February, March, etc. That’s why your number of monthly listeners updates every day.
  • They are unique listeners. If someone plays your music multiple times in a 28-day period, they only get counted once.

Tracking trends using your monthly listeners timeline can give you a good idea of how your music is performing over longer periods of time, and can also help you understand overall engagement and listening behavior after a new release. For more immediate changes with a higher level of detail, keep an eye on your number of daily listeners.

We use a rolling window of 28 days to calculate your monthly listeners because the number of days in a calendar month can vary, and because people listen to music differently depending on the day of the week.

Any set of 28 consecutive days includes an equal number of days of the week—so, the same number of Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, etc. This allows you to compare different 28-day periods without your monthly listener stat being impacted by differences in the total number of days or the total number of Fridays and Saturdays, for example.

Daily listeners are unique listeners who play your music during a 24-hour period. You can see how many daily listeners you have by hovering over the timeline graph on your Audience page.

The daily listeners stat gives you a detailed look at changes to the number of people listening to your music on Spotify. This number is especially helpful for tracking engagement and listening behavior after a new release.

Remember: these are unique listeners. If someone plays your music multiple times in a 24-hour period, they only get counted once.

Saves are the total number of times listeners on Spotify have saved your music. This can happen in one of two ways:

  • They hit + to save your music to their library
  • They add your music to one of their playlists

Head to your Songs page in Spotify for Artists to see the number of times each of your songs have been saved.

Yes, you have a compare tool in Spotify for Artists. You can find it under the timeline graph on your Audience page. Use it to compare your number of listeners, streams, or followers with any other artist on Spotify (up to 2 other artists at the same time).

We recommend comparing yourself to artists who are in a similar stage of their career to avoid flattening out the stats in the timeline. If an artist has released music on Spotify recently, you’ll probably see a spike in their number of listeners, streams, and followers.

If we haven’t given you access to an artist, we can only show you high-level stats that are otherwise available from other sources.

Artists who compare their stats to yours can only see high-level stats that are otherwise available from other sources. Only people who have been given access can see your detailed stats.

Most artists on Spotify see a split of 53% male to 47% female listeners, so a 50-50 split would mean that you have more female listeners than average.

This stat represents the percentage of your audience who identify as non-binary. Your listeners who do not identity as male or female select “non-binary” when they register for Spotify.

Your live listener count appears once you have an average of 10 or more people listening to your music at the same time.

You’ll see a “—” when looking at your stats in Spotify for Artists for a few reasons:

  • We don’t offer the stat—for example, all-time listeners or all-time saves for a specific song.
  • You have a stat for the last 28 days, but when you filter for last 7 days or last 24 hours that stat drops to zero.
  • The date your song was released or added to a playlist is not available.

For a playlist to appear on your Playlists page in Spotify for Artists, your music needs at least 2 listeners from that playlist.

We also only show the top 100 playlists per type, ordered by listeners of your msuic from that playlist.

The trend arrows in the Songs section in Spotify for Artists show you changes compared to the average amount of listening each of your songs gets in a given day or week.

Gray arrows show which of your songs are getting moderate increases or decreases compared to that average, and red or green arrows show significant increases or decreases.

You need to filter your song stats by last 7 days or last 24 hours to see song trend arrows.

Right now, you can only see the top song in a playlist.

The pink dots below the timeline graph in your Audience section highlight significant milestones for your music on Spotify.

Hover over the timeline graph close to the pink dot to see what happened to your music on that day.

Right now milestones only appear when you get added to a Spotify editorial playlist—like Rap Caviar, Rock This, or New Music Friday. But keep an eye out—we’ll be adding more to the graph in the future.

Like all the other stats in your Audience section, your milestones update every day.

Streams are reported in Spotify for Artists when a song is streamed for over 30 seconds.

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